CBD and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Peer-reviewed studies into the potential effects of Cannabidiol and IBS

On this page, CBD and Inflammation, you will find research pertaining to the use of Cannabidiol and Cannabinoids and its possible effects on IBS. The information below is not meant to influence your opinion, but rather give you access to a wealth of scientific literature in an attempt to make and educated and informed choice. Click Here to see all of the conditions that have been researched alongside CBD and IBS.

 

Cannabidiol in inflammatory bowel diseases: a brief overview.

From the abstract:

This minireview highlights the importance of cannabidiol (CBD) as a promising drug for the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD)..CBD is a very promising compound since it shares the typical cannabinoid beneficial effects on gut lacking any psychotropic effects… This strategic interaction makes CBD as a potential candidate for the development of a new class of anti-IBD drugs.

Cannabidiol Reduces Intestinal Inflammation through the Control of Neuroimmune Axis

From the abstract:

Cannabidiol (CBD) is an interesting compound because of its ability to control reactive gliosis in the CNS, without any unwanted psychotropic effects. Therefore the rationale of our study was to investigate the effect of CBD on intestinal biopsies from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and from intestinal segments of mice with LPS-induced intestinal inflammation. CBD markedly counteracted reactive enteric gliosis in LPS-mice trough the massive reduction of astroglial signalling neurotrophin S100B… results therefore indicate that CBD indeed unravels a new therapeutic strategy to treat inflammatory bowel diseases…

Clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CECD): can this concept explain therapeutic benefits of cannabis in migraine fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and other treatment-resistant conditions?

From the abstract:

Migraine, fibromyalgia, IBS and related conditions display common clinical, biochemical and pathophysiological patterns that suggest an underlying clinical endocannabinoid deficiency that may be suitably treated with cannabinoid medicines

Cannabinoid actions at TRPV channels: effects on TRPV3 and TRPV4 and their ppotential relevance to gastrointestinal inflammation.

From the abstract:

Plant cannabinoids, like Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), activate/desensitize thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels of vanilloid type-1 or -2 (TRPV1 or TRPV2)..Cannabinoids can affect both the activity and the expression of TRPV1-4 channels, with various potential therapeutic applications, including in the gastrointestinal tract.

Beneficial effect of the non-psychotropic plant cannabinoid cannabigerol on experimental inflammatory bowel disease

From the abstract:

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an incurable disease which affects millions of people in industrialized countries. Anecdotal and scientific evidence suggests that Cannabis use may have a positive impact in IBD patients. Here, we investigated the effect of cannabigerol (CBG), a non-psychotropic Cannabis-derived cannabinoid, in a murine model of colitis..CBG could be considered for clinical experimentation in IBD patients.

Cannabinoids and the gut: new developments and emerging concepts.

From the abstract:

Cannabis has been used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) conditions that range from enteric infections and inflammatory conditions to disorders of motility, emesis and abdominal pain..We focus on the pharmacological actions of cannabinoids in relation to GI disorders, highlighting recent data on genetic mutations in the endocannabinoid system in GI disease.

Endocannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract 

From the abstract:

In the past centuries, different preparations of marijuana have been used for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, such as GI pain, gastroenteritis and diarrhea..or such protective activities, the endocannabinoid system may represent a new promising therapeutic target against different GI disorders, including frankly inflammatory bowel diseases (eg, Crohn’s disease), functional bowel diseases (eg, irritable bowel syndrome), and secretion- and motility-related disorders.

Cannabinoids and gastrointestinal motility: animal and human studies.

From the abstract:

The plant Cannabis has been known for centuries to be beneficial in a variety of gastrointestinal diseases, including emesis, diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal pain. delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychotropic component of Cannabis, acts via at least two types of cannabinoid receptors, named CB1 and CB2 receptors... Overall, modulation of the gut endogenous cannabinoid system may provide a useful therapeutic target for disorders of gastrointestinal motility.

The Role of the Endocannabinoid System in the Brain-Gut Axis.

From the abstract:

The ECS is involved in the control of nausea and vomiting and visceral sensation. The homeostatic role of the ECS also extends to the control of intestinal inflammation. We review the mechanisms by which the ECS links stress and visceral pain..Increasing our understanding of the ECS will greatly advance our knowledge of interactions between the brain and gut and could lead to new treatments for gastrointestinal disorders.

Cannabinoids and GI Disorders: Endogenous and Exogenous.

From the abstract:

Despite the political and social controversy affiliated with it, the medical community must come to the realization that cannabinoids exist as a ubiquitous signaling system in many organ systems..

Most therapeutics currently on the market presently target only one aspect of the cannabinoid system. Our main purpose here is to highlight areas of research and potential avenues of discovery that the cannabinoid system has yet to reveal.