CBD and Colitis and Crohn’s

Peer-reviewed studies into the potential effects of Cannabidiol and Colitis/Crohn’s

On this page, CBD and Crohns, you will find research pertaining to the use of Cannabidiol and Cannabinoids and its possible effects on Colitis and Crohns. The information below is not meant to influence your opinion, but rather give you access to a wealth of scientific literature in an attempt to make and educated and informed choice. Click Here to see all of the conditions that have been researched alongside CBD and Colitis/Crohn’s.

 

Crohn’s 

Cannabis finds its way into treatment of Crohn’s disease.

From the abstract:

In ancient medicine, cannabis has been widely used to cure disturbances and inflammation of the bowel. A recent clinical study now shows that the medicinal plant Cannabis sativa has lived up to expectations and proved to be highly efficient in cases of inflammatory bowel diseases. In a prospective placebo-controlled study, it has been shown what has been largely anticipated from anecdotal reports, i.e. that cannabis produces significant clinical benefits in patients with Crohn’s disease.

Hergenrather presents study of Crohn’s patients as a template for clinical research on Cannabis

From the article:

IBD —Inflammatory Bowel Disease, which include Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis— might seem relatively esoteric to include in an introductory talk about cannabis medicine. Hergenrather focused on it because his own study of IBD patients provides a model by which the effectiveness of the herb can be evaluated as a treatment for any given disorder. Cannabis medicine is an emerging field, and it provides an unprecedented opportunity for doctors to conduct meaningful research.

Cannabinoids and gastrointestinal motility: animal and human studies.  

From the abstract:

The plant Cannabis has been known for centuries to be beneficial in a variety of gastrointestinal diseases, including emesis, diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal pain. delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychotropic component of Cannabis, acts via at least two types of cannabinoid receptors, named CB1 and CB2 receptors… Overall, modulation of the gut endogenous cannabinoid system may provide a useful therapeutic target for disorders of gastrointestinal motility.

Colitis

Cannabidiol, a safe and non-psychotropic ingredient of the marijuana plant Cannabis sativa, is protective in a murine model of colitis.

From the abstract:

Inflammatory bowel disease affects millions of individuals; nevertheless, pharmacological treatment is disappointingly unsatisfactory. Cannabidiol, a safe and non-psychotropic ingredient of marijuana, exerts pharmacological effects (e.g., antioxidant) and mechanisms (e.g., inhibition of endocannabinoids enzymatic degradation) potentially beneficial for the inflamed gut..In conclusion, cannabidiol, a likely safe compound, prevents experimental colitis in mice.

The effects of Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol alone and in combination on damage, inflammation and in vitro motility disturbances in rat colitis.

From the abstract:

(-)-Cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown to interact with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in behavioural studies, but it remains to be established if these cannabinoids interact in vivo in inflammatory disorders. Therefore the effects of CBD and THC alone and in combination were investigated in a model of colitis..In this model of colitis, THC and CBD not only reduced inflammation but also lowered the occurrence of functional disturbances. Moreover the combination of CBD and THC could be beneficial therapeutically, via additive or potentiating effects.

Topical and systemic cannabidiol improves trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid colitis in mice.

From the abstract:

Cannabidiol (CBD) is such a side effect-free phytocannabinoid that improves chemically induced colitis in rodents when given intraperitoneally. Here, we tested the possibility whether rectal and oral application of CBD would also ameliorate colonic inflammation, as these routes of application may represent a more appropriate way for delivering drugs in human colitis..The data of this study indicate that in addition to intraperitoneal application, intrarectal delivery of cannabinoids may represent a useful therapeutic administration route for the treatment of colonic inflammation.

Manipulation of the Endocannabinoid System in Colitis: A Comprehensive Review.

From the abstract:

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a lifelong disease of the gastrointestinal tract whose annual incidence and prevalence is on the rise. Current immunosuppressive therapies available for treatment of IBD offer limited benefits and lose effectiveness, exposing a significant need for the development of novel therapies. In the clinical setting, cannabis has been shown to provide patients with IBD symptomatic relief, although the underlying mechanisms of their anti-inflammatory effects remain unclear.