CBD and Chronic Pain

Peer-reviewed studies into the potential effects of Cannabidiol and Chronic Pain

On this page, CBD and Chronic Pain, you will find research pertaining to the use of Cannabidiol and Cannabinoids and its possible effects on Chronic Pain. The information below is not meant to influence your opinion, but rather give you access to a wealth of scientific literature in an attempt to make and educated and informed choice. Click Here to see all of the conditions that have been researched alongside CBD and Chronic Pain.

Cannabidiol inhibits paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain through 5-HT(1A) receptors without diminishing nervous system function or chemotherapy efficacy.

From the abstract:

Our data suggest that CBD is protective against PAC-induced neurotoxicity mediated in part by the 5-HT(1A) receptor system. Furthermore, CBD treatment was devoid of conditioned rewarding effects or cognitive impairment and did not attenuate PAC-induced inhibition of breast cancer cell viability. Hence, adjunct treatment with CBD during PAC chemotherapy may be safe and effective in the prevention or attenuation of CIPN... 

Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placeo-controlled, parallel-group study of the efficacy, safety, adn tolerability of THC:CBD extract and THC extract in patients with intractable cancer-related pain.

From the abstract:

 

This study compared the efficacy of a tetrahydrocannabinol:cannabidiol (THC:CBD) extract, a nonopioid analgesic endocannabinoid system modulator, and a THC extract, with placebo, in relieving pain in patients with advanced cancer. In total, 177 patients with cancer pain, who experienced inadequate analgesia despite chronic opioid dosing, entered a two-week, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial… This study shows that THC:CBD extract is efficacious for relief of pain in patients with advanced cancer pain not fully relieved by strong opioids.

Marijuana extract helps prevent chemo pain.

From the article:

 

Cannabidiol, an extract from marijuana, may be a promising treatment to prevent pain in those getting the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel, U.S. researchers say, Sara Jane Ward and colleagues of Temple University School of Pharmacy in Philadelphia said cannabidiol has pain- and inflammation-reducing effects, while avoiding the psychoactive side effects of marijuana and other “cannabinoid” compounds.

Meta-analysis of cannabis based treatments for neuropathic and multiple sclerosis-related pain.

From the abstract:

Debilitating pain, occurring in 50-70{03c6ed9c7292793a5635106886a6facae0686a7e7bfbe6c29280aa83fc7d030a} of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, is poorly understood and infrequently studied… Cannabinoids including the cannabidiol/THC buccal spray are effective in treating neuropathic pain in .

 

Sativex: clinical efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis and neuropathic pain.  

From the abstract:

Development has concentrated on the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis, notably spasticity and neuropathic pain, as well as the treatment of neuropathic pain of other aetiologies. Positive results in placebo-controlled trials of the use of Sativex as an add-on therapy in these indications demonstrate that Sativex is efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of these symptoms.

Cannabis, pain, and sleep: lessons from the therapeutic clinical trials of Sativex, a cannabis-based medicine.

From the abstract:

Cannabis sativa L. has been utilized for treatment of pain and sleep disorders since ancient times. This review examines modern studies on effects of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) on sleep… wherein 40-50{03c6ed9c7292793a5635106886a6facae0686a7e7bfbe6c29280aa83fc7d030a} of subjects attained good or very good sleep quality, a key source of disability in chronic pain syndromes that may contribute to patients’ quality of life.

Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic plant-derived cannabinoid, decreases inflammation in a murine model of acut lung injury: role for the adenosine A(2A) receptor.

From the abstract:

Cannabinoids are known to have analgesic properties. We evaluated the effect of oro-mucosal sativex, (THC: CBD), an endocannabinoid system modulator, on pain and allodynia, in 125 patients with neuropathic pain of peripheral origin in a five-week, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design trial… The mean reduction in pain intensity scores (primary outcome measure) was greater in patients receiving sativex than placebo… Improvements in Neuropathic Pain Scale composite score (p=0.007), sleep NRS (p=0.001), dynamic allodynia (p=0.042), punctate allodynia (p=0.021), Pain Disability Index (p=0.003) and Patient’s Global Impression of Change (p<0.001) were similarly greater on sativex vs. placebo… An open-label extension study showed that the initial pain relief was maintained without dose escalation or toxicity for 52 weeks.

Cannabinoids for neuropathic pain.

From the abstract:

Treatment options for neuropathic pain have limited efficacy and use is fraught with dose-limiting adverse effects. The endocannabinoid system has been elucidated over the last several years, demonstrating a significant interface with pain homeostasis… This article reviews the history, pharmacologic development, clinical trials results, and the future potential of nonsmoked, orally bioavailable, nonpsychoactive cannabinoids in the management of neuropathic pain.

Neuropathic orofacial pain: cannabinoids as a therapeutic avenue. 

From the abstract:

Neuropathic orofacial pain (NOP) exists in several forms including pathologies such as burning mouth syndrome (BMS), persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP), trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN)... Analgesia is one the principal therapeutic targets of the cannabinoid system and many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of cannabinoid compounds in the treatment of neuropathic pain. This review will investigate the potential use of cannabinoids in the treatment of symptoms associated with NOP.

Oromucosal delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol for neuropathic pain associate with multiple sclerosis: an uncontrolled, open-label, 2-year extension trial. 

From the abstract:

Central neuropathic pain (CNP), pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction of the central nervous system, occurs in ~28{03c6ed9c7292793a5635106886a6facae0686a7e7bfbe6c29280aa83fc7d030a} of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol (THC/CBD), an endocannabinoid system modulator, has demonstrated efficacy for up to 4 weeks in randomized controlled trials in the treatment of CNP in patients with MS… THC/CBD was effective, with no evidence of tolerance, in these select patients with CNP and MS who completed approximately 2 years of treatment (n = 28). 

Vanilloid TRPV1 receptor mediates the antihyperalgesic effect of the nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, cannabidiol, in a rat model of acute inflamation.

From the abstract:

Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychoactive marijuana constituent, was recently shown as an oral antihyperalgesic compound in a rat model of acute inflammation. We examined whether the CBD antihyperalgesic effect could be mediated by cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) or cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) and/or by transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1)… results demonstrate that TRPV1 receptor could be a molecular target of the CBD antihyperalgesic action.

Antihyperalgesic effect of a Cannabis sativa extract in a rat model of neuropathic pain: mechanisms involved.

From the abstract:

This study aimed to give a rationale for the employment of phytocannabinoid formulations to treat neuropathic pain…  The non-psychoactive compound, cannabidiol, is the only component present at a high level in the extract able to bind to this receptor: thus cannabidiol was the drug responsible for the antinociceptive behaviour observed.

Non-psychoactive cannabinoids modulate the descending pathway of antinociception in anaesthetized rats through several mechanisms of action.

From the abstract:

Two non-psychoactive cannabinoids, cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabichromene (CBC), are known to modulate in vitro the activity of proteins involved in nociceptive mechanisms… CBD and CBC stimulated descending pathways of antinociception and caused analgesia by interacting with several target proteins involved in nociceptive control. These compounds might represent useful therapeutic agents with multiple mechanisms of action.

Cannabinoids suppress inflammatory and neuropathic pain by targeting alpha3 glycine receptors.

From the abstract:

Certain types of nonpsychoactive cannabinoids can potentiate glycine receptors (GlyRs), an important target for nociceptive regulation at the spinal level. However, little is known about the potential and mechanism of glycinergic cannabinoids for chronic pain treatment. We report that systemic and intrathecal administration of cannabidiol (CBD), a major nonpsychoactive component of marijuana, and its modified derivatives significantly suppress chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain without causing apparent analgesic tolerance in rodents… These cannabinoids may represent a novel class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of chronic pain and other diseases involving GlyR dysfunction.

Role of the cannabinoid system in pain control and therapeutic implications for the management of acute and chronic pain episodes.

From the abstract:

Preclinical and clinical studies have suggested that they may result useful to treat diverse diseases, including those related with acute or chronic pain… Recently, Cannabis sativa extracts, containing known doses of tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, have granted approval in Canada for the relief of neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis.

Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain.

From the abstract:

Sativex((R)), a cannabis derived oromucosal spray containing equal proportions of THC (partial CB(1) receptor agonist ) and cannabidiol (CBD, a non-euphoriant, anti-inflammatory analgesic with CB(1) receptor antagonist and endocannabinoid modulating effects) was approved in Canada in 2005 for treatment of central neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis, and in 2007 for intractable cancer pain… Cannabinoid analgesics have generally been well tolerated in clinical trials with acceptable adverse event profiles. Their adjunctive addition to the pharmacological armamentarium for treatment of pain shows great promise.

Pot Users Less Likely to Take Painkillers

From the article:

…according to a new study by one of the nation’s larges drug screening companies, chronic pain patients who are prescribed hydrocodone are less likely to take the painkiller if they are using marijuana.

 

Cannabidiol-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol interactions on acute pain and locomotor activity.

From the abstract:

Previous studies suggest that cannabidiol (CBD) may potentiate or antagonize Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol’s (THC) effects. The current study examined sex differences in CBD modulation of THC-induced antinociception, hypolocomotion, and metabolism… results suggest that CBD may enhance THC’s antinociceptive and hypolocomotive effects, primarily prolonging THC’s duration of action; however, these effects were small and inconsistent across experiments. CBD inhibition of THC metabolism as well other mechanisms likely contribute to CBD-THC interactions on behavior.

Cannabidiol Is a Potential Therapeutic for the Affective-Motivational Dimension of Incision Pain in Rats.

From the abstract:

Cannabidiol (CBD), a phytocannabinoid found in Cannabis sativa, has been utilized in preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of pain. Herein, we evaluate the effects of CBD… CBD evokes antinociceptive effects in a manner similar to the systemic administration of CBD. In addition, the study gives further support to the notion that the sensorial and affective dimensions of pain may be differentially modulated by CBD.